zombies-and-glitter:

Look at this dumbass.  There is no part of the mouse in his mouth.  He’s just got it squished between his body and his head.  I have no words. …

zombies-and-glitter:

Look at this dumbass.
There is no part of the mouse in his mouth.
He’s just got it squished between his body and his head.
I have no words. …

Those eyes!

Those eyes!

Toaster and Quicksilver went to new homes yesterday, but today I received four new friends in return! Clockwise from upper left, meet Mead (2013 female Bumble Bee, currently in shed), Custard (2013 female Lesser), Cannoli (2014 male Lavender Albino), and Éclair (2013 female Het. Lavender Albino)!

(I know I just said I wasn’t looking to add the Spider gene to my collection, but the Bee came with the rest in the trade and has no visible wobble. Not sure if I’ll breed her, though.)

gamerphonzy said: So... what is headboob, anatomically speaking?

crispysnakes:

It’s the muscles surrounding the jaws.  The shape of the head is determined by the shape of the skull.  

Here’s a boa:

Here’s a boa skull.  Note the structure of the jaws, particularly the back end where sit the the two joints that control the gape of the snake (snakes have five mobile and one immobile joint within their skulls).  See the boxy, rounded shape those two joints make?

Here are the two overlaid:

Now imagine the muscles needed to control those joints.  Depending on the species/size of the snake and the prey they feed on, they’ll need more or less muscle mass to operate their jaws.  

See those big fleshy white things in the corners of the mouth?  That’s all muscle that, when the mouth is closed, occupies the space in the skull that people like to squish.  

That, is headboob.  

Bookworm.

Bookworm.

The results are in! After counting both reblog replies and PMs, the winning name is…..
*drumroll* Truffle!
Truffle snoot says thanks for the input. :)

The results are in! After counting both reblog replies and PMs, the winning name is…..

*drumroll* Truffle!

Truffle snoot says thanks for the input. :)

Caught my big normal girl Meryl bowl-wrapping this morning. She was bred last winter to Mousse and my brother’s odd-looking Cinnamon male Brock, but I didn’t think she took. Gonna stick Pepper Jack in with her tonight just in case!

solid-snakes:

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!
-Hazelnut
-Peanut
-Pepper
-Pudding
-Maple 
-Waffle
-Truffle
-Bonbon
-Cupcake

solid-snakes:

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!

-Hazelnut

-Peanut

-Pepper

-Pudding

-Maple 

-Waffle

-Truffle

-Bonbon

-Cupcake

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!
-Hazelnut
-Peanut
-Pepper
-Pudding
-Maple 
-Waffle
-Truffle
-Bonbon
-Cupcake

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!

-Hazelnut

-Peanut

-Pepper

-Pudding

-Maple 

-Waffle

-Truffle

-Bonbon

-Cupcake

Anonymous said: Do you know how to guesstimate a healthy ball python's age? Like is the head a certain size? I would assume that you couldn't base it off girth or weight but maybe length? What would you say?

It’s hard to say, really! Ball pythons grow at different rates. Some just eat better than others, and grow bigger and faster as a result. I have an early 2013 female at 1350 grams who will have no problem making it to breeding size this winter. My picky 2012 pastel, however, has barely broken 1000 grams. Females tend to grow faster and get bigger than males, and genetics play a part as well. On average, though, I’d expect a healthy yearling to be between 700 and 1000 grams. 

Anonymous said: Sorry if this is a dumb question, but what is the difference between 50% het and 66% het?

That’s not a dumb question at all! In ball pythons, the percentages just refer to the odds that any animal in a given clutch is heterozygous (or “het”) for a recessive trait. If an animal is heterozygous, it has the appearance of a “normal” ball python but carries a copy of the recessive gene.

If, for example, a snake that is 100% heterozygous for albino is bred to a normal, each of the offspring resulting from the pairing has a 50% chance of being heterozygous for albino as well. If both parents are 100% het for albino, each of their normal-looking offspring has a 66% (or one in three) chance of carrying the recessive gene. 

Anonymous said: I don't think reptiles are meant to be pets. They are wild animals and dont provide the same levels that dogs and cats do. Can you use a snake as a therapy amimal? No.

followthebluebell:

i-m-obnoxious:

pedestrianwolf:

reptiliaherps:

Okay. So I can almost guarantee that you wouldn’t say this about someone’s cute little aquatic turtle or someone’s fish or a tree frog. I’m willing to bet any amount of money that this comes from bias towards snakes because of your ignorant misconceptions. It’s okay to not understand an animal or be afraid of it. It’s not okay to tell me that I’m less deserving of my animals because of your personal issues with them.

As far as them being therapy animals goes, I can and will say that the most calming thing I have the ability to do at home is sit down with olly on my stomach or my lap and run my hands gently down him, which he doesn’t mind at all. My snakes have the ability to let me de-compress in only a few minutes when I’m stressed just by letting me touch them.

People find their own personal therapy jn different ways. Some people do best with therapy dogs and whatnot, some people use sensory objects, some people go on walks, I handle my snakes.

Thanks though.

To add to this, I have TERRIBLE anxiety and the calming effects handling snakes provides me with are what prevents me from having to take anti-anxiety medication. They can be fantastic therapy animals.

Agreed. If I’m near a panic attack taking out any of my snakes sends it away almost immediately. 

Reptiles can make incredible therapy animals, especially for people with allergies to fur. I’ve brought Ngarehu with me to my Mom’s hospice and the residents there were active and interested in learning more about him. He was able to make connections to people who weren’t able to connect to an active and bouncy puppy.

Personally, I find him very soothing to handle as well. In public, when I feel like I’m on the brink of an anxiety attack, I can put my hand on him and remind myself why I’m outside. He’s the best emotional support animal I could have asked for. This is perfect for me since most anti-anxiety meds just put me to sleep.

Reptiles don’t experience emotions like us, but that’s ok. Sometimes it’s really nice to just slow down and pat a lizard or a snake.

Gumdrop the floating head.

Gumdrop the floating head.

Fudge’s unboxing video. :)

Another snake? Oh, Fudge!

Just picked up this adorable dark young man from Ben Siegel Reptiles. He’s a Green Pastel Mahogany!