Fudge’s crazy iridescence. 

Poor girl! I’ll take some more pics after she sheds.

Poor girl! I’ll take some more pics after she sheds.

Biscotti being bashful.

babytreekangaroo said: I want to start preparing for a ball python. I want everything to be perfect before I start looking at snakes though. On average what would be a decent sized tank in the long run? I know that size can very but just as an average

I wouldn’t use a glass tank if you can help it. It’s hard to keep the humidity up and shy snakes like BPs are often intimidated by the “openness” of tanks.

They may not be pretty, but Sterilite boxes make much better enclosures. Smaller adults can be comfortably housed in 32 quart tubs, but for large males and most females, you’ll eventually have to upgrade to 41 quart containers. Hatchlings and juvies should be kept in smaller tubs until they mature.

Anonymous said: when I was in third grade, my mother, sister and I went out hiking. While on the way up we crossed this cool arched rock. While walking I didn't see a copperhead sunning itself and stepped on it. I remember hearing the hiss and my mom shouting "Run!" I luckily didn't get bit since we were in the middle of nowhere. That's essentially why I dislike most snakes. the only snake I'm okay with are corn snakes.

reptiliaherps:

I’m sorry that you experienced that kind of fear, but let’s put things into perspective!

So, there’s a copperhead. Pretty small in comparison to us. Soakin’ up the sun summer style on a rock, and all of the sudden, this giant monster over 50 times its size steps on it.This poor copperhead, although it’s not your fault, was probably just as shocked as you were about the incident. The poor dude wanted to get some sun and I’m quite sure that nowhere on its agenda was “be stepped on by some giant,” and if it had an opportunity to, it most likely would have fled from you. 

Snakes aren’t fortunate enough to have arms and opposable thumbs and other digits to punch us in the face with when we accidentally step on them. The only defense they have is their mouth. For some snakes, they happen to have an added line of defense and that line of defense is venom. 

I can assure you that any snake, regardless of whether it has venom or not, would probably try to bite the shit out of you if you scared it or stepped on it like that. Even corn snakes. 

Copperheads, other than being slightly more defensive when necessary, don’t show behaviors that are much different than other snakes. They don’t want to be in our way and we don’t want to be in theirs. 

I’ll also let you know right now that running was probably unnecessary— they don’t chase. Getting out of the way quickly is good enough. I’m sure it went in the opposite direction in hopes of never being stepped on again. 

As much as I can understand why a scary incident like that can put you off from loving snakes, it’s not fair to any animal to dislike them as a whole because an animal reacted the same exact way that almost any other kind of animal would have reacted. I’ve stepped on my family dog’s paw and she bit me for it. Try to be a little more understanding. I promise, they’re not out to get you!

warpedcake said: I am very comfortable with snakes and would love to get one but i have not had any reptiles of my own before. I have done research on care for them but I was wondering what type of snake I should get as my first. I definitely want one I can handle with ease. Any tips and suggestions or certain things I should read up on would be great. Thank you.

Hello! Good on you for doing your research. A lot of people just jump right into pet ownership, and the animal ends up suffering for it.

As much as I love ball pythons, I’m hesitant to suggest getting one as your first snake. Even with proper care, they are prone to going off feed from time to time, which is fine for the snake in most cases but extremely stressful on the owner (trust me—I know from experience!). Small North American colubrids like corns, ratsnakes, and milksnakes are hardy, easy keepers with strong appetites, and they come in a rainbow of reasonably-priced color morphs. Sand boas and rosy boas also make good first snakes, as they are easily handled and stay relatively small. 

The forums at Ball-Pythons.net were very helpful for me as a beginner and I still visit them frequently when I have questions or concerns about my animals. They have a collection of care sheets for many different species and separate forums where you can discuss and research the care and breeding of colubrids, boas, pythons, and other reptiles. 

Once you decide on a species, make sure the snake you pick is well-started and eating on its own. I’d recommend getting an animal that’s at least a couple months old (or even better, an adult) as your first snake. Many species can be picky eaters as babies, and assist-feeding a hatchling is not something a new snake owner should attempt.

Good luck, and happy researching!

snekysnek:

Found my macro lens! It’s so hard to pick just one!

Little lesserbee. ♥

Aww. It still has its baby skin!

zombies-and-glitter:

Look at this dumbass.  There is no part of the mouse in his mouth.  He’s just got it squished between his body and his head.  I have no words. …

zombies-and-glitter:

Look at this dumbass.
There is no part of the mouse in his mouth.
He’s just got it squished between his body and his head.
I have no words. …

Those eyes!

Those eyes!

Toaster and Quicksilver went to new homes yesterday, but today I received four new friends in return! Clockwise from upper left, meet Mead (2013 female Bumble Bee, currently in shed), Custard (2013 female Lesser), Cannoli (2014 male Lavender Albino), and Éclair (2013 female Het. Lavender Albino)!

(I know I just said I wasn’t looking to add the Spider gene to my collection, but the Bee came with the rest in the trade and has no visible wobble. Not sure if I’ll breed her, though.)

gamerphonzy said: So... what is headboob, anatomically speaking?

crispysnakes:

It’s the muscles surrounding the jaws.  The shape of the head is determined by the shape of the skull.  

Here’s a boa:

Here’s a boa skull.  Note the structure of the jaws, particularly the back end where sit the the two joints that control the gape of the snake (snakes have five mobile and one immobile joint within their skulls).  See the boxy, rounded shape those two joints make?

Here are the two overlaid:

Now imagine the muscles needed to control those joints.  Depending on the species/size of the snake and the prey they feed on, they’ll need more or less muscle mass to operate their jaws.  

See those big fleshy white things in the corners of the mouth?  That’s all muscle that, when the mouth is closed, occupies the space in the skull that people like to squish.  

That, is headboob.  

Bookworm.

Bookworm.

The results are in! After counting both reblog replies and PMs, the winning name is…..
*drumroll* Truffle!
Truffle snoot says thanks for the input. :)

The results are in! After counting both reblog replies and PMs, the winning name is…..

*drumroll* Truffle!

Truffle snoot says thanks for the input. :)

Caught my big normal girl Meryl bowl-wrapping this morning. She was bred last winter to Mousse and my brother’s odd-looking Cinnamon male Brock, but I didn’t think she took. Gonna stick Pepper Jack in with her tonight just in case!

solid-snakes:

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!
-Hazelnut
-Peanut
-Pepper
-Pudding
-Maple 
-Waffle
-Truffle
-Bonbon
-Cupcake

solid-snakes:

Since “Mercury” is staying with me, I’ve decided to change her name to fit my sweets/snacks theme. :) Any suggestions? Let me know, or pick your favorite from the list below!

-Hazelnut

-Peanut

-Pepper

-Pudding

-Maple 

-Waffle

-Truffle

-Bonbon

-Cupcake